WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?

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WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that can occur in genetically predisposed people where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. It is estimated to affect 1 in 100 people worldwide. Two and one-half million Americans are undiagnosed and are at risk for long-term health complications.

healthy and damaged villi

When people with celiac disease eat gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye and barley), their body mounts an immune response that attacks the small intestine. These attacks lead to damage on the villi, small fingerlike projections that line the small intestine, that promote nutrient absorption. When the villi get damaged, nutrients cannot be absorbed properly into the body.

Celiac disease is hereditary, meaning that it runs in families. People with a first-degree relative with celiac disease (parent, child, sibling) have a 1 in 10 risk of developing celiac disease.
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A Simple And Cheap Solution To Help Your Child Manage Their Diabetes

Researchers behind a new study believe caring for a pet may lead to better regulation of diabetes, especially in adolescents. Since adolescents can display stubborn attitudes towards regular maintenance of diabetes symptoms, pets may help teenagers with managing Type 1 diabetes during this stage of life.

Researchers studied 28 adolescent patients between the ages of 10 and 17 at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Each patient was given a pet fish to care for over a period of time. During that period of time, each patient fed the pet in the morning and evening, and then changed one-fourth of the water in the fish’s bowl once per week. Each time a patient fed a fish, it was a reminder to check his/her glucose levels. And when the patients changed the water in the tank, they reviewed the notes they had taken about their blood sugar levels with a caregiver.

“Caring for pets gave teenagers a sense of responsibility similar to an adult caring for a child.”

Read more at http://blog.thediabetessite.com/cs-study-pets-solution/#MLYHrmBu3VS3HIC1.99

Get Ready for Summer with Paracord Medical Bracelets!

Get ready for summer with the paracord medical bracelet. Water resistant, great for all summer activities. They come in a variety of styles and colors and will be engraved specifically with your medical information. The tag is securely woven into the band and is attached with a plastic clasp. See the selection at: www.stylishmedicalid.com

FDA Strengthens Heart Risk Warnings for Common Pain Relievers

 

Health Buzz: FDA Strengthens Heart Risk Warnings for Common Pain Relievers

Read labels carefully before taking ibuprofen and other NSAIDs.

Close-up image of a young customer choosing the necessary remedy in the drugstoreRead over-the-counter and prescription medication labels carefully before taking NSAIDs.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to improve the warning labels featured on non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs – NSAIDs – so they reflect that the drugs increase the risk of for heart attack or stroke.

In 2005, the FDA added boxed warning labels about cardiovascular risk to all prescription NSAIDs. However, a new comprehensive review found that the risk for heart attack or stroke can happen even after using NSAIDs for a short term, like a few weeks – an earlier estimate than previously stated.

This new safety information prompted the update on the drugs commonly used to treat toothaches, back pain, strains or sprains, menstrual cramps and headaches, according to an agency announcement.

Patients who take over-the-counter or prescription NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac and celecoxib, should seek immediate medical attention if they experience chest pain, shortness of breath or trouble breathing, weakness in one part or side of their body or slurred speech.

“Be careful not to take more than one product that contains an NSAID at a time,” Dr. Karen Mahoney, deputy director of the FDA’s Division of Nonprescription Drug Products, said in the consumer update.

Read the Drug Facts label for additional information on the proper way to take NSAIDs, she adds. If you already have high blood pressure or heart disease, speak to a health care provider before using NSAIDs.

10 Ways to Lower Your Risk of Stroke
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Tips for Managing Food Allergies

Tips for Managing Food Allergies
To successfully manage your food allergy, you’ll have to change your diet and lifestyle. These changes may seem overwhelming at first, but things will get easier over time. We recommend starting with the following basic measures to safeguard yourself for a reaction, as well as prepare yourself for challenges you may face in different environments:

Emergency Medication
Since there is not yet a medication that can prevent food allergies, strict avoidance of the allergy-causing food is the only way to prevent a reaction. If a reaction does occur, medications are administered to control symptoms. If your doctor has prescribed medication such as epinephrine (Auvi-Q™, EpiPen® or Adrenaclick®), carry it with you at all times. Auto-injector “trainers” (a device similar to an auto-injector, but containing no needle or medication) are available for you to practice with.

Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan
Ask your doctor for a written plan that outlines when and how to use your medicine. Download a Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan form and ask your doctor to fill it out.

Medical Identification
Wearing medical identification at all times can help to make emergency responders aware of your or your child’s food allergies. Learn more about FARE’s “My Voice” program on the MedicAlert website.

Managing Food Allergies in Different Environments
Planning in advance how to handle certain situations, reading labels vigilantly, and learning to avoid problem foods are the keys to managing a food allergy. Healthcare professionals and families dealing with food allergies have developed strategies and tips to help you or a loved one to stay safe. In the Managing Food Allergies at… section, you’ll find advice on coping with your food allergy in every area of your life.

Type 1 Diabetes Causes

Type 1 Diabetes Causes
What leads to the development of type 1 diabetes?
Written by Daphne E. Smith-Marsh PharmD, CDE | Reviewed by W. Patrick Zeller MD
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It isn’t entirely clear what triggers the development of type 1 diabetes. Researchers do know that genes play a role; there is an inherited susceptibility. However, something must set off the immune system, causing it to turn against itself and leading to the development of type 1 diabetes.

Genes Play a Role in Type 1 Diabetes
Some people cannot develop type 1 diabetes; that’s because they don’t have the genetic coding that researchers have linked to type 1 diabetes. Scientists have figured out that type 1 diabetes can develop in people who have a particular HLA complex. HLA stands for human leukocyte antigen, and antigens function is to trigger an immune response in the body.

There are several HLA complexes that are associated with type 1 diabetes, and all of them are on chromosome 6.

Different HLA complexes can lead to the development of other autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Like those conditions, type 1 diabetes has to be triggered by something—usually a viral infection.

What Can Trigger Type 1 Diabetes
Here’s the whole process of what happens with a viral infection: When a virus invades the body, the immune system starts to produce antibodies that fight the infection. T cells are in charge of making the antibodies, and then they also help in fighting the virus.
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Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month

 

Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month
Wednesday, July 1 | Arthritis Foundation
July Is National Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month
Each year at this time, we commemorate the estimated 300,000 children and their families in the United States who face the everyday challenges of living with juvenile arthritis (JA) and related diseases. Juvenile arthritis is an umbrella term used to describe the many autoimmune and inflammatory conditions or pediatric rheumatic diseases that can develop in children and teens.

The various types of juvenile arthritis share many common symptoms, like pain, joint swelling, redness and warmth, but each type of JA is distinct and has its own unique characteristics and how it affects the body.

Common Types of Juvenile Arthritis

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

Considered the most common form of childhood arthritis, JIA includes six subtypes: oligoarthritis, polyarthritis, systemic, enthesitis-related, juvenile psoriatic arthritis or undifferentiated.

Juvenile dermatomyositis

An inflammatory disease, juvenile dermatomyositis causes muscle weakness and a skin rash on the eyelids and knuckles.

Juvenile lupus

Lupus is an autoimmune disease. The most common form is systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE. Lupus can affect the joints, skin, kidneys, blood and other parts of the body.

Juvenile scleroderma

Scleroderma, which literally means “hard skin,” describes a group of conditions that can cause the skin to tighten and harden.

Kawasaki disease

This disease causes blood vessel inflammation that can lead to heart complications.

Mixed connective tissue disease

This disease may include features of arthritis, lupus dermatomyositis and scleroderma, and is associated with very high levels of a particular antinuclear antibody called anti-RNP.

Fibromyalgia

This chronic pain syndrome is an arthritis-related condition, which can cause stiffness and aching, along with fatigue, disrupted sleep and other symptoms. More common in girls, fibromyalgia is seldom diagnosed before puberty.

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Food Cures for Celiac Disease

Food Cures for Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is a surprisingly common disorder — one that’s treated entirely by making the right changes to your diet. Get great tips for celiac disease treatment and diet.
Celiac disease is a surprisingly common autoimmune disorder. It can begin at any time in a person’s life, and there is no consistent set of symptoms. Luckily, the disease is almost entirely treatable with the appropriatedietary changes — so feeling better is as simple as knowing what to eat and what to avoid.

 
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Understand Your Risk for Diabetes

Understand Your Risk for Diabetes
Diabetes contributes to over 230,000 U.S. deaths per year. However, many people with type 2 diabetes are not aware they have the disease and may already have developed various health complications associated with it.

Non-Modifiable Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

There are a number of risk factors that increase a person’s risk for developing prediabetes and, ultimately, type 2 diabetes. Some of these characteristics are beyond a person’s control, such as:

Family history
If you have a blood relative with diabetes, your risk for developing it is significantly increased. Map out your family history tree (PDF) and take it to your doctor to find out what it means for you.
Race or ethnic background
If you are of African-American, Asian-American, Latino/Hispanic-American, Native American or Pacific Islander descent, you have a greater likelihood of developing diabetes.
Age
The older you are, the higher your risk. Generally, type 2 diabetes occurs in middle-aged adults, most frequently after age 45. However, health care providers are diagnosing more and more children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes.
History of gestational diabetes
If you developed diabetes during pregnancy or delivered a baby over 9 lbs., you are at increased risk.

Modifiable Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

While some things that contribute to the development of diabetes are beyond a person’s control, there are also a number of modifiable risk factors. By making healthy changes in these areas, people can reduce their risks or delay the development of diabetes and improve their overall quality of life.

Overweight/obesity
About 50 percent of men and 70 percent of women who have diabetes are obese. If you are 20 percent or more over your optimal body weight, you have a higher risk of developing diabetes. Losing five to seven percent of your body weight can cut your risk of developing prediabetes in half, and your risk decreases even more as you lose more weight. Learn how to manage your weight.
Physical inactivity
Along with overweight/obesity, physical inactivity ranks among the top modifiable risk factors for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. By achieving 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity or 90 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity or a combination of the two, you can improve your health and minimize risks for diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
High blood pressure (hypertension)
In addition to causing damage to the cardiovascular system, untreated high blood pressure has been linked to the development of diabetes. Learn more about high blood pressure and how to control it.
Abnormal cholesterol (lipid) levels
Low HDL “good” cholesterol” and/or high triglycerides can increase the risk for Type 2 diabetes. Both of these abnormalities can also increase your risk for cardiovascular disease. A healthy eating plan, sufficient aerobic physical activity, and a healthy weight can help improve abnormal lipds. Sometimes medicinations are necessary.
By following our healthy living tips, you can take control of these modifiable risk factors, prevent or delay the development of diabetes, and improve your quality of life.

This content was last reviewed on 7/5/2012.

Take Me Out to the Ballgame!

Just in time for the baseball season our newest medical bracelet is sure to please the baseball fan. Take me out to the ball game with these real baseball bracelet. This medical bracelet is made with real baseballs found in local antique stores. If you want a shiny new type bracelet this is not the bracelet for you. Each is unique, some are more soiled than others. The bracelet will attach with a silver toned button and the medical ID charm will attach to the leather portion of the bracelet. The sizes will be approximate, as this is very hard to size to exact measurements.

This medical bracelet will include a custom engraved heart/round charm. Each charm will have different engraving limitations. Only one engraved charm, either heart/round is included in the price of this bracelet. The charms are stainless steel and measure heart, about 3/4′ X 1″ and the round charm about 1/2″.