Take Me Out to the Ballgame!

Just in time for the baseball season our newest medical bracelet is sure to please the baseball fan. Take me out to the ball game with these real baseball bracelet. This medical bracelet is made with real baseballs found in local antique stores. If you want a shiny new type bracelet this is not the bracelet for you. Each is unique, some are more soiled than others. The bracelet will attach with a silver toned button and the medical ID charm will attach to the leather portion of the bracelet. The sizes will be approximate, as this is very hard to size to exact measurements.

This medical bracelet will include a custom engraved heart/round charm. Each charm will have different engraving limitations. Only one engraved charm, either heart/round is included in the price of this bracelet. The charms are stainless steel and measure heart, about 3/4′ X 1″ and the round charm about 1/2″.

Genetics of Diabetes

Genetics of Diabetes

You’ve probably wondered how you developed diabetes. You may worry that your children will develop it too.

Unlike some traits, diabetes does not seem to be inherited in a simple pattern. Yet clearly, some people are born more likely to develop diabetes than others.

What Leads to Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different causes. Yet two factors are important in both. You inherit a predisposition to the disease then something in your environment triggers it.

Genes alone are not enough. One proof of this is identical twins. Identical twins have identical genes. Yet when one twin has type 1 diabetes, the other gets the disease at most only half the time.

When one twin has type 2 diabetes, the other’s risk is at most 3 in 4.

Type 1 Diabetes

In most cases of type 1 diabetes, people need to inherit risk factors from both parents. We think these factors must be more common in whites because whites have the highest rate of type 1 diabetes.

Because most people who are at risk do not get diabetes, researchers want to find out what the environmental triggers are.

One trigger might be related to cold weather. Type 1 diabetes develops more often in winter than summer and is more common in places with cold climates.

Another trigger might be viruses. Perhaps a virus that has only mild effects on most people triggers type 1 diabetes in others.

Early diet may also play a role. Type 1 diabetes is less common in people who were breastfed and in those who first ate solid foods at later ages.

In many people, the development of type 1 diabetes seems to take many years. In experiments that followed relatives of people with type 1 diabetes, researchers found that most of those who later got diabetes had certain autoantibodies in their blood for years before.

(Antibodies are proteins that destroy bacteria or viruses. Autoantibodies are antibodies ‘gone bad,’ which attack the body’s own tissues.)

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Hot Summer Sale!

Don’t miss out on the hot summer sale going on now through July 15th. Your favorite items are all on sale with a 15% discount on your total order. Use code summer2015 when checking out to receive this offer.

Importance of Wearing a Medical Alert Bracelet with Diabetes

Medical alert bracelets enable rapid identification of patients with a number of illnesses, including diabetes, which can make them unable to communicate their illness to others, according to Shamai Grossman, M.D., Director of the Cardiac Emergency Center and Clinical Decision Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is clinically affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center).

How They’re Beneficial for People with Diabetes

Medical alert bracelets can be extremely important for people with diabetes. Should you have a low blood glucose reaction and suddenly become confused or unresponsive, the bracelet allows immediate identification of the problem to both bystanders and paramedics. The sooner the low blood glucose reactions can be identified, the sooner they can be treated.

Emergency department personnel also use medical alert bracelets to rapidly identify people with diabetes, particularly when they may not be able to express that they have diabetes on their own. On arrival to an emergency department, one of the routine parts of the evaluation of the critically ill, unconscious, or disoriented patients is to remove their clothing to inspect the body for a cause of their sudden alteration, Grossman says. In these situations, medical alert bracelets can be invaluable as a time saver.
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PEANUT ALLERGY

Peanut Allergy
FOODALLERGY.ORG
Peanut allergy is one of the most common food allergies. Peanuts can cause a severe, potentially fatal, allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). Therefore it is advised that people with peanut allergy have quick access to an epinephrine auto-injector (such as an EpiPen®, Auvi-Q™ or Adrenaclick®) at all times. To prevent a reaction, strict avoidance of peanut and peanut products is essential. Always read ingredient labels to identify peanut ingredients.

Allergy to peanuts appears to be on the rise in children. According to a FARE-funded study, the number of children in the U.S. with peanut allergy more than tripled between 1997 and 2008.1 Studies in the United Kingdom and Canada also showed a high prevalence of peanut allergy in schoolchildren.

Peanut allergies tend to be lifelong, although studies indicate that approximately 20 percent of children with peanut allergy do eventually outgrow their allergy. Younger siblings of children allergic to peanuts may be at increased risk for allergy to peanuts. Your doctor can provide guidance about testing for siblings.

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Crucial Questions to Ask When You’re Choosing a Nursing Home

 

Speak to all sorts of staff members  and residents – before making your decision.

Caregiver showing resident something on a tablet – with Best Nursing Homes 2015 badgeFrom services to activities, here’s what potential residents should consider.

By + More

 

Brian Capshaw, now 52, was a corporate cost accountant in Connecticut when a 1994 car accident left him paralyzed from the chest down. He continued working until 2005, and within two years it became apparent he would need ongoing care. At 45, he became a resident at the East Hartford nursing facility where he’s been living since.

When choosing a facility, Capshaw had two main criteria: instate location, and the capability to give him the services he required. That narrowed his choices to two facilities. Capshaw and family members talked to an admissions representative and took a tour while visiting each. Seven years later, Capshaw has become an advocate for nursing-home residents. Given what he knows now, he says he would have asked a much wider range of questions during those initial visits, and talked to a variety of staff members while also seeking input from residents themselves.

Mitzi McFatrich has a different vantage point. As executive director of Kansas Advocates for Better Care, a statewide nonprofit that works on long-term care and elder abuse issues, she’s seen many nursing homes, dug into countless reports of deficient care and testified on issues affecting residents’ well-being. She and Capshaw recommend some key questions to consider when deciding on nursing homes to visit. And you can locate possible facilities and find inspection data by searching the U.S. News Best Nursing Homes rankings, as well as downloading a comprehensive checklist for visits.
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Yoga may improve cardiovascular and metabolic health

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

namasteYoga has been around for centuries, with writings extolling its virtues in producing serenity and transcendence – but world leaders, as well as a growing collection of scientific research, are pointing to how the ancient practice also can be good for your health.

The United Nations General Assembly passed a resolution commemorating June 21 as International Day of Yoga. Cosponsored by more than 170 member states, representatives said yoga not only promotes “clarity of vision and action” but health.

“Yoga can contribute to resilience against non-communicable diseases. Yoga can bring communities together in an inclusive manner that generates respect,” U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon told the news agency Reuters at the time of the resolution in December. “Yoga is a sport that can contribute to development and peace. Yoga can even help people in emergency situations to find relief from stress.”

A recent review of 37 randomized controlled trials concluded that yoga may improve cardiovascular and metabolic health, according to researchers at Harvard University and its Schools of Medicine and Public Health and Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands. The study was published in December in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

The research paper said “yoga showed significant improvement” for body mass index, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (also called “bad”) cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (also called “good”) cholesterol compared to those who did not exercise. The study noted “significant changes” in heart rate, body weight and diastolic blood pressure, as well.

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Traveling this Summer?

Traveling this summer? Don’t leave home without one of our laminated personalized bag tags with your specific medical information. Use on your suitcase, purse, diaper bag, the possibilities are endless. We have over 30 styles to choose from. Your bag tag includes a plastic hanger to attach to your items.  Don’t leave home without it!

Don’t Forget Dad! Father’s Day is this Sunday

Don’t forget dad this year by giving him the most important gift possible, a life saving medical ID bracelet, necklace, or dog tag. Each item is custom engraved with dad’s important medical and contact information. Unique styles are sure to impress dad. Save 15% with our current promotion using this code: summer2015.