Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month

 

Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month
Wednesday, July 1 | Arthritis Foundation
July Is National Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month
Each year at this time, we commemorate the estimated 300,000 children and their families in the United States who face the everyday challenges of living with juvenile arthritis (JA) and related diseases. Juvenile arthritis is an umbrella term used to describe the many autoimmune and inflammatory conditions or pediatric rheumatic diseases that can develop in children and teens.

The various types of juvenile arthritis share many common symptoms, like pain, joint swelling, redness and warmth, but each type of JA is distinct and has its own unique characteristics and how it affects the body.

Common Types of Juvenile Arthritis

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

Considered the most common form of childhood arthritis, JIA includes six subtypes: oligoarthritis, polyarthritis, systemic, enthesitis-related, juvenile psoriatic arthritis or undifferentiated.

Juvenile dermatomyositis

An inflammatory disease, juvenile dermatomyositis causes muscle weakness and a skin rash on the eyelids and knuckles.

Juvenile lupus

Lupus is an autoimmune disease. The most common form is systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE. Lupus can affect the joints, skin, kidneys, blood and other parts of the body.

Juvenile scleroderma

Scleroderma, which literally means “hard skin,” describes a group of conditions that can cause the skin to tighten and harden.

Kawasaki disease

This disease causes blood vessel inflammation that can lead to heart complications.

Mixed connective tissue disease

This disease may include features of arthritis, lupus dermatomyositis and scleroderma, and is associated with very high levels of a particular antinuclear antibody called anti-RNP.

Fibromyalgia

This chronic pain syndrome is an arthritis-related condition, which can cause stiffness and aching, along with fatigue, disrupted sleep and other symptoms. More common in girls, fibromyalgia is seldom diagnosed before puberty.

 click to read more

Arthritis Foundation Helps Achieve a Big Victory in One Boy’s Fight Against Arthritis

Arthritis, especially when it affects children, can result in having to say No to many, many things. Just getting out of bed can be a challenge, let alone battling big insurance or pharmaceutical companies to gain access to care that’s needed to manage the disease. While we do all we can to help increase the number of everyday victories, there are times when big victories are achieved in the lives of those with arthritis. And when they are, we celebrate them.

Just this past month, after a three-year-long fight, Zane Breier, who suffers from scleroderma morphea, achieved one of these victories. Last year, in the middle of his fight, Zane was our Youth Honoree for the Jingle Bell Run event in San Diego, helping raise awareness, support and funds for our collective fight against arthritis. At the same time, his condition was rapidly declining and began to spread and affect more areas of his body. Plastic surgery became a consideration, as Zane’s face, tongue and eyes were affected by his disease. He had to have gum grafts, and he and his family began to lose hope. The fight became tiring and the obstacles felt insurmountable.

Zane’s doctor, pediatric rheumatologist Dr. Johanna Chang at Rady’s Children’s Hospital, prescribed Orencia for Zane, but his health insurance provider denied coverage. Their claim was that Orencia was not indicated for children and no “testing” had been done on children. Still Dr. Chang continued to fight on Zane’s behalf, submitting documentation to show that Orencia had been of benefit to other children. But Zane and his family were denied again.

While it was first anticipated that Zane would only need to be on the medication for 6 months or less, that forecast turned into a year or more, and without insurance coverage of his medication, his family of five could not afford to absorb that cost.

The Arthritis Foundation helped the family tap into other resources for help, and the rejections continued. Despite the hurdles, we and the Breier family didn’t give up. We continued to press Zane’s insurance provider to conduct a review of his case and reconsider coverage. The team at Zane’s hospital also reached out to his provider, informing them that, if denied coverage for Orencia, there was nothing else the hospital could do to help slow the progression of Zane’s disease.
click to read more