Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Differences between Type I & Type II Diabetes

Filed under: Health Infographics | 1 Comment »type-one-versus-type-two-diabetes-differences

I don’t think enough people realize how prevalent and how serious diabetes is in our country. Treatment has come a long way for those with Type I and that is great, but Type II is a form of diabetes that really doesn’t need to be a epidemic if we (United States) could consume less and exercise a bit more. I mean, aren’t there enough horrible viruses, diseases and illnesses trying to kill us without us doing it to ourselves with a poor diet and sedentary lifestyle helping us to an early grave? But I digress…

I don’t think enough people realize how prevalent and how serious diabetes is in our country. Treatment has come a long way for those with Type I and that is great, but Type II is a form of diabetes that really doesn’t need to be a epidemic if we (United States) could consume less and exercise a bit more. I mean, aren’t there enough horrible viruses, diseases and illnesses trying to kill us without us doing it to ourselves with a poor diet and sedentary lifestyle helping us to an early grave? But I digress…
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Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month

 

Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month
Wednesday, July 1 | Arthritis Foundation
July Is National Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month
Each year at this time, we commemorate the estimated 300,000 children and their families in the United States who face the everyday challenges of living with juvenile arthritis (JA) and related diseases. Juvenile arthritis is an umbrella term used to describe the many autoimmune and inflammatory conditions or pediatric rheumatic diseases that can develop in children and teens.

The various types of juvenile arthritis share many common symptoms, like pain, joint swelling, redness and warmth, but each type of JA is distinct and has its own unique characteristics and how it affects the body.

Common Types of Juvenile Arthritis

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

Considered the most common form of childhood arthritis, JIA includes six subtypes: oligoarthritis, polyarthritis, systemic, enthesitis-related, juvenile psoriatic arthritis or undifferentiated.

Juvenile dermatomyositis

An inflammatory disease, juvenile dermatomyositis causes muscle weakness and a skin rash on the eyelids and knuckles.

Juvenile lupus

Lupus is an autoimmune disease. The most common form is systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE. Lupus can affect the joints, skin, kidneys, blood and other parts of the body.

Juvenile scleroderma

Scleroderma, which literally means “hard skin,” describes a group of conditions that can cause the skin to tighten and harden.

Kawasaki disease

This disease causes blood vessel inflammation that can lead to heart complications.

Mixed connective tissue disease

This disease may include features of arthritis, lupus dermatomyositis and scleroderma, and is associated with very high levels of a particular antinuclear antibody called anti-RNP.

Fibromyalgia

This chronic pain syndrome is an arthritis-related condition, which can cause stiffness and aching, along with fatigue, disrupted sleep and other symptoms. More common in girls, fibromyalgia is seldom diagnosed before puberty.

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Genetics of Diabetes

Genetics of Diabetes

You’ve probably wondered how you developed diabetes. You may worry that your children will develop it too.

Unlike some traits, diabetes does not seem to be inherited in a simple pattern. Yet clearly, some people are born more likely to develop diabetes than others.

What Leads to Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different causes. Yet two factors are important in both. You inherit a predisposition to the disease then something in your environment triggers it.

Genes alone are not enough. One proof of this is identical twins. Identical twins have identical genes. Yet when one twin has type 1 diabetes, the other gets the disease at most only half the time.

When one twin has type 2 diabetes, the other’s risk is at most 3 in 4.

Type 1 Diabetes

In most cases of type 1 diabetes, people need to inherit risk factors from both parents. We think these factors must be more common in whites because whites have the highest rate of type 1 diabetes.

Because most people who are at risk do not get diabetes, researchers want to find out what the environmental triggers are.

One trigger might be related to cold weather. Type 1 diabetes develops more often in winter than summer and is more common in places with cold climates.

Another trigger might be viruses. Perhaps a virus that has only mild effects on most people triggers type 1 diabetes in others.

Early diet may also play a role. Type 1 diabetes is less common in people who were breastfed and in those who first ate solid foods at later ages.

In many people, the development of type 1 diabetes seems to take many years. In experiments that followed relatives of people with type 1 diabetes, researchers found that most of those who later got diabetes had certain autoantibodies in their blood for years before.

(Antibodies are proteins that destroy bacteria or viruses. Autoantibodies are antibodies ‘gone bad,’ which attack the body’s own tissues.)

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Importance of Wearing a Medical Alert Bracelet with Diabetes

Medical alert bracelets enable rapid identification of patients with a number of illnesses, including diabetes, which can make them unable to communicate their illness to others, according to Shamai Grossman, M.D., Director of the Cardiac Emergency Center and Clinical Decision Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is clinically affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center).

How They’re Beneficial for People with Diabetes

Medical alert bracelets can be extremely important for people with diabetes. Should you have a low blood glucose reaction and suddenly become confused or unresponsive, the bracelet allows immediate identification of the problem to both bystanders and paramedics. The sooner the low blood glucose reactions can be identified, the sooner they can be treated.

Emergency department personnel also use medical alert bracelets to rapidly identify people with diabetes, particularly when they may not be able to express that they have diabetes on their own. On arrival to an emergency department, one of the routine parts of the evaluation of the critically ill, unconscious, or disoriented patients is to remove their clothing to inspect the body for a cause of their sudden alteration, Grossman says. In these situations, medical alert bracelets can be invaluable as a time saver.
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Yoga may improve cardiovascular and metabolic health

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

namasteYoga has been around for centuries, with writings extolling its virtues in producing serenity and transcendence – but world leaders, as well as a growing collection of scientific research, are pointing to how the ancient practice also can be good for your health.

The United Nations General Assembly passed a resolution commemorating June 21 as International Day of Yoga. Cosponsored by more than 170 member states, representatives said yoga not only promotes “clarity of vision and action” but health.

“Yoga can contribute to resilience against non-communicable diseases. Yoga can bring communities together in an inclusive manner that generates respect,” U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon told the news agency Reuters at the time of the resolution in December. “Yoga is a sport that can contribute to development and peace. Yoga can even help people in emergency situations to find relief from stress.”

A recent review of 37 randomized controlled trials concluded that yoga may improve cardiovascular and metabolic health, according to researchers at Harvard University and its Schools of Medicine and Public Health and Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands. The study was published in December in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

The research paper said “yoga showed significant improvement” for body mass index, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (also called “bad”) cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (also called “good”) cholesterol compared to those who did not exercise. The study noted “significant changes” in heart rate, body weight and diastolic blood pressure, as well.

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Traveling this Summer?

Traveling this summer? Don’t leave home without one of our laminated personalized bag tags with your specific medical information. Use on your suitcase, purse, diaper bag, the possibilities are endless. We have over 30 styles to choose from. Your bag tag includes a plastic hanger to attach to your items.  Don’t leave home without it!

Food and Stress? EVERYTHING is related!

April 30, 2015
Food and Stress? EVERYTHING is related!

Eat to beat stress. Is food related to stress?
Well, it´s actually a two-way street. You can stress your body from food and modern living or you can use nutrition to alleviate the damage from stressful living.

Eating in general causes a state that is known as oxidative stress. When we digest our food we form compound molecules called free radicals, these molecules may be harmful to DNA, protein and lipids in our bodies, which at the same time contribute to a state of physiological stress and premature aging.

Nutritional stress is a type of physical stress, more common for 21st century men and women because of the rapid change in the food industry and consumption of over processed filled foods. Our body in an effort to assimilate and metabolize foods filled with harmful artificial flavorings, colorings and additives causes the release of even more free radicals and additional oxidative stress. We also live at such a high pace that we half chew our foods while on the run adding strain to our digestive system.

Are we filling up with toxins, sugary, fat, and chemically loaded food and then expecting it to cope without any complaints?

If we are not properly nourished, we will not have the tools required to fight off diseases. Nutrition is essential to life, without it our systems can fail, starting with a weak immune system that cannot fight invaders leaving us susceptible to infections, diseases and even to overweight and obesity. Stress also has an additional effect on the immune system. A person who is stressed may engage in unhealthy behaviors to cope and try to reduce stress like drinking, smoking or eating comfort, but nutrient void foods. Stress is linked to many different ailments, such as, headaches, infectious illnesses, cardiovascular disease, chronic diseases like diabetes and cancer, asthma, gastric ulcers, you name it!
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