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Just sharing another BEAUTIFUL medical ID bracelet with a few additions with my own leather bracelets!

My “hats off” to Diana! iap_300x300.813947684_65jro5oc

College Kids Need Medical Bracelets Too!

Don’t forget the college kids when getting ready for back to school. Lots of great styles of medical bracelets to choose from, see more atwww.stylishmedicalid.com

Most of our styles are custom made and engraved especially for you with your specific medical information. Bracelets normally are made and shipped out to you within 2  business days.

Over 100 styles to choose from you are surely to find one to fit your style and budget.

Medical ID Pendants

This rubber necklace is a great option for those not wanting a medical ID bracelet. Your necklace will include your choice of a latex free rubber necklace which will be fastened with a stainless steel clasp. The necklace chain will measure about 16″. The medical charm measures about 1 inch by 3/4 of an inch and engraving in included in the price. $24.99

www.stylishmedica…www.stylishmedica…

WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?

Home › Celiac Disease › What is Celiac Disease?
WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that can occur in genetically predisposed people where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. It is estimated to affect 1 in 100 people worldwide. Two and one-half million Americans are undiagnosed and are at risk for long-term health complications.

healthy and damaged villi

When people with celiac disease eat gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye and barley), their body mounts an immune response that attacks the small intestine. These attacks lead to damage on the villi, small fingerlike projections that line the small intestine, that promote nutrient absorption. When the villi get damaged, nutrients cannot be absorbed properly into the body.

Celiac disease is hereditary, meaning that it runs in families. People with a first-degree relative with celiac disease (parent, child, sibling) have a 1 in 10 risk of developing celiac disease.
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A Simple And Cheap Solution To Help Your Child Manage Their Diabetes

Researchers behind a new study believe caring for a pet may lead to better regulation of diabetes, especially in adolescents. Since adolescents can display stubborn attitudes towards regular maintenance of diabetes symptoms, pets may help teenagers with managing Type 1 diabetes during this stage of life.

Researchers studied 28 adolescent patients between the ages of 10 and 17 at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Each patient was given a pet fish to care for over a period of time. During that period of time, each patient fed the pet in the morning and evening, and then changed one-fourth of the water in the fish’s bowl once per week. Each time a patient fed a fish, it was a reminder to check his/her glucose levels. And when the patients changed the water in the tank, they reviewed the notes they had taken about their blood sugar levels with a caregiver.

“Caring for pets gave teenagers a sense of responsibility similar to an adult caring for a child.”

Read more at http://blog.thediabetessite.com/cs-study-pets-solution/#MLYHrmBu3VS3HIC1.99

Get Ready for Summer with Paracord Medical Bracelets!

Get ready for summer with the paracord medical bracelet. Water resistant, great for all summer activities. They come in a variety of styles and colors and will be engraved specifically with your medical information. The tag is securely woven into the band and is attached with a plastic clasp. See the selection at: www.stylishmedicalid.com

Tips for Managing Food Allergies

Tips for Managing Food Allergies
To successfully manage your food allergy, you’ll have to change your diet and lifestyle. These changes may seem overwhelming at first, but things will get easier over time. We recommend starting with the following basic measures to safeguard yourself for a reaction, as well as prepare yourself for challenges you may face in different environments:

Emergency Medication
Since there is not yet a medication that can prevent food allergies, strict avoidance of the allergy-causing food is the only way to prevent a reaction. If a reaction does occur, medications are administered to control symptoms. If your doctor has prescribed medication such as epinephrine (Auvi-Q™, EpiPen® or Adrenaclick®), carry it with you at all times. Auto-injector “trainers” (a device similar to an auto-injector, but containing no needle or medication) are available for you to practice with.

Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan
Ask your doctor for a written plan that outlines when and how to use your medicine. Download a Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan form and ask your doctor to fill it out.

Medical Identification
Wearing medical identification at all times can help to make emergency responders aware of your or your child’s food allergies. Learn more about FARE’s “My Voice” program on the MedicAlert website.

Managing Food Allergies in Different Environments
Planning in advance how to handle certain situations, reading labels vigilantly, and learning to avoid problem foods are the keys to managing a food allergy. Healthcare professionals and families dealing with food allergies have developed strategies and tips to help you or a loved one to stay safe. In the Managing Food Allergies at… section, you’ll find advice on coping with your food allergy in every area of your life.