Battle Your Diabetes With These Tips

10505948395114019442Don’t be one of the many diabetes sufferers out there who put their faith in so-called miracle drugs and dangerous procedures to correct the body’s ability to produce insulin. Stay educated and always learn about any method you’re attempting to control your disease. Read this article for some diabetes tips you can use.

To go trick-or-treating, or not to go? That is a very tough question for the parent of a Diabetic child. The fact is that your child is never going to eat all that candy or else they’ll lapse into a coma. Instead, why not have a party at your house for all the kids in your neighborhood?

Diabetic children can often feel ostracized or different than their classmates. You must remind your child that everyone is different, and that they’re just like any children with peanut allergies or a pair of glasses. Their Diabetes is just a bump in their life, not a hurdle, and they’ll be a stronger person some day for working hard at keeping it at bay.

Herbal tea is a great drink for diabetics as it contains many wonderful nutrients and can taste so good you don’t even think about adding cream or sugar. Be sure to check the ingredients as some manufacturers will add sugar or artificial sweeteners.

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, I am sure you know how to check your blood sugar. You should check it before meals and at bedtime. This insures that if there is a sudden change in your blood sugar levels, you know in advance to address the situation in a timely fashion lest an emergency arise.
click to view more

Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Differences between Type I & Type II Diabetes

Filed under: Health Infographics | 1 Comment »type-one-versus-type-two-diabetes-differences

I don’t think enough people realize how prevalent and how serious diabetes is in our country. Treatment has come a long way for those with Type I and that is great, but Type II is a form of diabetes that really doesn’t need to be a epidemic if we (United States) could consume less and exercise a bit more. I mean, aren’t there enough horrible viruses, diseases and illnesses trying to kill us without us doing it to ourselves with a poor diet and sedentary lifestyle helping us to an early grave? But I digress…

I don’t think enough people realize how prevalent and how serious diabetes is in our country. Treatment has come a long way for those with Type I and that is great, but Type II is a form of diabetes that really doesn’t need to be a epidemic if we (United States) could consume less and exercise a bit more. I mean, aren’t there enough horrible viruses, diseases and illnesses trying to kill us without us doing it to ourselves with a poor diet and sedentary lifestyle helping us to an early grave? But I digress…
click to read more

Genetics of Diabetes

Genetics of Diabetes

You’ve probably wondered how you developed diabetes. You may worry that your children will develop it too.

Unlike some traits, diabetes does not seem to be inherited in a simple pattern. Yet clearly, some people are born more likely to develop diabetes than others.

What Leads to Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different causes. Yet two factors are important in both. You inherit a predisposition to the disease then something in your environment triggers it.

Genes alone are not enough. One proof of this is identical twins. Identical twins have identical genes. Yet when one twin has type 1 diabetes, the other gets the disease at most only half the time.

When one twin has type 2 diabetes, the other’s risk is at most 3 in 4.

Type 1 Diabetes

In most cases of type 1 diabetes, people need to inherit risk factors from both parents. We think these factors must be more common in whites because whites have the highest rate of type 1 diabetes.

Because most people who are at risk do not get diabetes, researchers want to find out what the environmental triggers are.

One trigger might be related to cold weather. Type 1 diabetes develops more often in winter than summer and is more common in places with cold climates.

Another trigger might be viruses. Perhaps a virus that has only mild effects on most people triggers type 1 diabetes in others.

Early diet may also play a role. Type 1 diabetes is less common in people who were breastfed and in those who first ate solid foods at later ages.

In many people, the development of type 1 diabetes seems to take many years. In experiments that followed relatives of people with type 1 diabetes, researchers found that most of those who later got diabetes had certain autoantibodies in their blood for years before.

(Antibodies are proteins that destroy bacteria or viruses. Autoantibodies are antibodies ‘gone bad,’ which attack the body’s own tissues.)

click to read more

It’s National Kidney Month!

Posted on March 4, 2014 by American Diabetes Association
March is National Kidney Month, a time to raise awareness about the prevention and early detection of kidney disease. Did you know that diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure? The good news is that managing your diabetes well can help improve your health outcomes.

So how does diabetes cause kidney disease? The process goes like this: When our bodies digest protein, the procedure creates waste products. In the kidneys, millions of tiny blood vessels with even tinier holes in them act as filters. As blood flows through the blood vessels, small molecules such as waste products squeeze through the holes. These waste products become part of the urine. Useful substances, such as protein and red blood cells, are too big to pass through the holes in the filter and stay in the blood.

Diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, can damage this system. High levels of blood glucose cause stress on the filtering system in the kidneys. After many years, they start to leak, and things like protein that are supposed to stay in the bloodstream are lost in the urine. Having small amounts of protein in the urine is called microalbuminuria. This damage happens without any symptoms.

In time, the kidneys stop working well. Waste products then start to build up in the blood. Finally, the kidneys fail. This failure, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), is very serious and requires a kidney transplant or dialysis.

Whew! Still with us? We hope so, because as mentioned above, the better a person keeps diabetes under control, the lower the chance of getting kidney disease. Research has shown that tight blood glucose control reduces the risk of microalbuminuria by one third. Other studies have suggested that tight control can even improve microalbuminuria.

Since there are usually no symptoms associated with early kidney failure, lab tests are essential. If you have diabetes, talk to your health care provider about how often you should be tested. This can be done by either a blood test or a urine test.
click to view more